Articles | Volume 41
Adv. Geosci., 41, 83–87, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-41-83-2016
Adv. Geosci., 41, 83–87, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-41-83-2016

  04 Apr 2016

04 Apr 2016

"SeismoSAT" project results in connecting seismic data centres via satellite

Damiano Pesaresi1, Wolfgang Lenhardt2, Markus Rauch3, Mladen Živčić4, Rudolf Steiner2, Michele Bertoni1, and Heimo Delazer3 Damiano Pesaresi et al.
  • 1OGS (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale), Trieste, Italy
  • 2Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik, Vienna, Austria
  • 3Protezione Civile della Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy
  • 4Agencija Republike Slovenije za Okolje, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Abstract. Since 2002 the OGS (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale) in Udine (Italy), the Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG) in Vienna (Austria), and the Agencija Republike Slovenije za Okolje (ARSO) in Ljubljana (Slovenia) are collecting, analysing, archiving and exchanging seismic data in real time. Up to now the data exchange between the seismic data centres relied on internet: this however was not an ideal condition for civil protection purposes, since internet reliability is poor. For this reason, in 2012 the Protezione Civile della Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano in Bolzano (Italy) joined OGS, ZAMG and ARSO in the Interreg IV Italia-Austria project "SeismoSAT" (Progetto SeismoSAT, 2014) aimed in connecting the seismic data centres in real time via satellite. As already presented in the past, the general technical schema of the project has been outlined, data bandwidths and monthly volumes required have been quantified, the common satellite provider has been selected and the hardware has been purchased and installed. Right before the end of its financial period, the SeismoSAT project proved to be successful guaranteeing data connection stability between the involved data centres during an internet outage.

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Short summary
Since 2002 OGS in Italy, ZAMG in Austria and ARSO in Slovenia were exchanging seismic data in real time via internet. This was not good for civil defense scopes because internet is not reliable: therefore, in 2012 the Protezione Civile di Bolzano in Italy joined OGS, ZAMG and ARSO in the Interreg IV Italia-Austria "SeismoSAT" project aimed in connecting the seismic data centers in real time via satellite.