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Advances in Geosciences An open-access journal for refereed proceedings and special publications
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Volume 4
Adv. Geosci., 4, 29–36, 2005
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-4-29-2005
© Author(s) 2005. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.
Adv. Geosci., 4, 29–36, 2005
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-4-29-2005
© Author(s) 2005. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  09 Aug 2005

09 Aug 2005

Developing natural resource models using the object modeling system: feasibility and challenges

L. R. Ahuja1, J. C. Ascough II1, and O. David2 L. R. Ahuja et al.
  • 1USDA-ARS-NPA, GPSRU, 2150 Centre Ave., Bldg. D, Suite 200, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA
  • 2Colorado State University, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA

Abstract. Current challenges in natural resource management have created demand for integrated, flexible, and easily parameterized hydrologic models. Most of these monolithic models are not modular, thus modifications (e.g., changes in process representation) require considerable time, effort, and expense. In this paper, the feasibility and challenges of using the Object Modeling System (OMS) for natural resource model development will be explored. The OMS is a Java-based modeling framework that facilitates simulation model development, evaluation, and deployment. In general, the OMS consists of a library of science, control, and database modules and a means to assemble the selected modules into an application-specific modeling package. The framework is supported by data dictionary, data retrieval, GIS, graphical visualization, and statistical analysis utility modules. Specific features of the OMS that will be discussed include: 1) how to reduce duplication of effort in natural resource modeling; 2) how to make natural resource models easier to build, apply, and evaluate; 3) how to facilitate long-term maintainability of existing and new natural resource models; and 4) how to improve the quality of natural resource model code and ensure credibility of model implementations. Examples of integrating a simple water balance model and a large monolithic model into the OMS will be presented.

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