Articles | Volume 2
Adv. Geosci., 2, 237–241, 2005
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-2-237-2005
Adv. Geosci., 2, 237–241, 2005
https://doi.org/10.5194/adgeo-2-237-2005

  11 Jul 2005

11 Jul 2005

What happens after the catchment caught the storm? Hydrological processes at the small, semi-arid Weatherley catchment, South-Africa

S. Uhlenbrook1, J. Wenninger2, and S. Lorentz3 S. Uhlenbrook et al.
  • 1UNESCO-IHE Institute of Water Education, P.O. Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft, The Netherlands
  • 2University of Freiburg, Institute of Hydrology, Fahnenbergplatz, 79098 Freiburg, Germany
  • 3University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Bioresources Engineering and Environmental Hydrology, Pietermaritzburg, South-Africa

Abstract. The knowledge of water flow pathways and residence times in a catchment are essential for predicting the hydrological response to a rain storm event. Different experimental techniques are available to study these processes, which are briefly reviewed in this paper. To illustrate this, recent findings from the Weatherley catchment a 1.5 km2 semi-arid headwater in South-Africa, are reported in this paper. Beside classical hydrometric measurements of precipitation and runoff different experimental techniques were applied to explore flow paths (i.e. soil moisture and groundwater measurements, natural tracers, and 2-D electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT)).